Red flags for dating violence

If they are unwilling to share even the most benign details of their life with you, how are you to connect on a more intimate level? Now, there is a difference between being a private person and being secretive.

Perhaps your partner likes to have an hour or two of quiet after work; maybe texts coming or going late at night aren’t appreciated—these might be signs of a person who prioritizes time alone rather than a person who’s living a double life.

The campaign encourages friends and other campus community members to say something when they see warning signs ("red flags") for sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking in a friend’s relationship.

The Campaign is a project of the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance, and was created by college students, college personnel, and community victim advocates.

Whether you live together or not, basic “how was your day,” “what did you do today” conversation is perfectly normal and expected.

Everyone gets angry sometimes, it’s the frequency and severity of your partner’s reactions that should act as a guide for your concerns.Again, shifts in mood can mean many things, but they’re undoubtedly a red flag for a bigger problem.There is such thing as taking a healthy interest in your partner’s life.Young people need to learn what healthy relationships look like and the importance of speaking up if dating violence occurs.Learn to recognize these red flags of abusive dating relationships: Dating violence does not discriminate — it can happen in any type of relationship, including a relationship that is serious or casual, monogamous or polygamous, short-term or long-term, gay or straight.

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